Monday, March 31, 2008

Seeing the possibilities

Mind Hacks talks about what you perceive in your environment:

Psychologists have something they call affordances (Gibson, 1977, 1986), which are features of the environment which seem to 'present themselves' as available for certain actions. Chairs afford being sat on, hammers afford hitting things with. The term captures an observation that there is something very obviously action-orientated about perception. We don't just see the world, we see the world full of possibilities. And this means that the affordances in the environment aren't just there, they are there because we have some potential to act (Stoffregen, 2003). If you are frail and afraid of falling then a handrail will look very different from if you are a skateboarder, or a freerunner. Psychology typically divides the jobs the mind does up into parcels : 'perception', (then) 'decision making', (then) 'action'. But if you take the idea of affordances seriously it gives lie to this neat division. Affordances exist because action (the 'last' stage) affects perception (the 'first' stage).

This could be the reason some people make it out of bad circumstances and others don't. If you don't perceive yourself as having the ability to act, as having agency in your own life, then you won't interpret the environment as containing possibilities you can affect by your action.

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